Marty & McGee: Enter Sandman and the best college football entrances

Each week during the 2020 season, Marty Smith and Ryan McGee will celebrate all of the stuff that makes college football great: the sights, sounds, places and pageantry that make it the greatest sport in these United States of America. The same kind of conversations you can hear and see during Marty & McGee, Wednesdays on SEC Network/ESPN App (7 p.m. ET) and Saturday mornings on SEC Network/ESPN App and ESPN Radio (7-10 a.m. ET). This week, the dynamic duo get hyped up for the best stadium entrances they’ve ever seen.

McGee: Well, let’s start with the stadium entrances that hit us right in the heart, that take us back to our homelands and the home teams that made us fall in love with college football in the first place. You’ve been going to games at Virginia Tech since you were a little boy. I can’t think of a stadium atmosphere that has changed more in our lifetimes, from a sleepy little venue in the hills of Blacksburg, Virginia, to …

Marty: “Enter Sandman,” son! It was 2000 when they started that tradition and I will never forget the first time I heard that rocking through Lane Stadium. People might not realize, but the team leaves the football building and it’s a bit of walk into the stadium. Then the players go into a long tunnel that empties into the north end zone, so by the time they finally cut those Hokies loose, they are pumped.

McGee: Chills. Every single time.

Marty: My favorite “Enter Sandman” wasn’t even an entrance. It was Miami vs. Virginia Tech back when that game was everything. It determined the Big East title every season. Then they both moved to the ACC and it never slowed down. It was 2011, Miami was driving and there was a timeout with few seconds left and they hit play on “Enter Sandman.” I remember Mike Patrick, the legendary ESPN play-by-play man, said, “These people are losing their minds!” At our ESPN college football seminar a few years ago, I went and found Mike to tell him that I still find that moment and play it when I’m having a bad day.

McGee: For me, as a Tennessee grad, when the Pride of the Southland Band forms that Power T in the north end zone, and then it splits and the team runs through, it’s just unreal. I think that moment is why I ended up at Tennessee in the first place. I was going to Georgia, but my dad was officiating at game at Tennessee, so I went there with him. My college roommates always ask, “When did you first see the Big Orange Jesus?” In other words, when did you say, “This is bigger than me and I have to be a part of this!” For me, I saw it the first time I saw the Vols run through the T.

Marty: Speaking of orange, how about Clemson running down The Hill?

McGee: Well, speaking of Dad, the first time he officiated a game at Clemson, he came home that night and said to me and my brother, “Boys, we thought we had seen big-time college football. But now I have really seen it.” And he was talking about the Tigers coming down The Hill into 80,000 people with the “Tiger Rag” playing and a bazillion balloons sailing into the air.

Marty: I have been fortunate enough to see it so many times, and for some huge games. Brent Musburger called it “the most exciting 25 seconds in college football” — how they get on those buses, ride to the other side of the stadium and touch Howard’s Rock and the cannon goes off and here they come, son. But if I’m being honest with you, I always cringe a little.

McGee: Me too.

Marty: It kind of humps, right? There’s a landing in the middle and then it keeps going down. I remember Deshaun Watson, he and other guys would hit that landing and kind of jump up in the air and then keep going. And I could think was, good Lord, please don’t one of these guys blow a knee out right now.

McGee: The students are sitting on that hill and they part like the Red Sea to make room for the run. All it would take is for one frat boy to accidentally leave a plastic cup or his girlfriend to leave her bag sitting there, and one guy trips and it would be like one of those high school football entrance blooper videos that are all over YouTube.

Marty: Like when they make the paper banner for the team to run through, but the paper was too thick and everyone just wipes out.

McGee: Or the one cheerleader who gets caught in front of the banner and they all crash into her.

Marty: How about just down the road in South Carolina, the Gamecocks coming in to “2001.”

McGee: The first time I went to Williams-Brice Stadium, I was like, “OK, how great could it be? Playing classical music over the PA system with some smoke machines.” But it was amazing. And back then the upper deck was designed to sway.

Marty: Was it really?

McGee: Yeah, and that thing got to moving around and I was like, “What the hell is this?!”

Marty: I got to see one of the best entrances in person just last weekend. The Ramblin’ Wreck of Georgia Tech, and that 1930 Model T comes blazing in there. There weren’t but 10,000 fans allowed to attend the game, but by God, when that Ramblin’ Wreck came rolling in there, you knew a football game was about to start.

McGee: Speaking of motorized vehicles, I was pumped for College Gameday to be at Wake Forest for its season opener because America got to see another underrated entrance, when the Demon Deacon comes riding across the turf on that Harley-Davidson chopper like he’s Peter Fonda in “Easy Rider.”

Marty: How about down in Tallahassee when Osceola rides out there, face paint and all, and plants that spear at the 50-yard line? Son, that’ll get you ready. I’ve been to Florida State for games with Clemson and Miami, and that will never get old.

McGee: We were there together three years ago for the season opener on Labor Day night. They had us set up in the end zone on a little stage and three hours before kickoff that guy was on his horse and practicing. It was his first game doing it. He kept missing and then it clicked in.

Marty: You think he was nervous?

McGee: I asked him. He said, “No, I’m good. But then again, they haven’t set this spear on fire yet, so we’ll see.”

Marty (laughs): How about Michigan, when they run out at the 50-yard line, leaping in the air to slap that banner and run into the Big House? Or Notre Dame, when the team emerges after you know the players just smacked that “Play like a champion today” sign?

McGee: Or Autzen Stadium at Oregon, the loudest place I’ve ever been that wasn’t a racetrack. I was there with Oklahoma and when the Ducks ran out, Adrian Peterson looked at me and he said something about how damn loud it was. But I have no idea exactly what he said because, well, it was so damn loud.

Marty: Listen, I am not a huge European soccer fan, and I know they have their traditions when it comes to entrances and chants and all of that. There are great traditions in every sport. But it’s the pageantry and the uniqueness of this, something like a stadium entrance that is never the same from one place to the other. This is what separates college football from everything else. It’s unparalleled throughout sport.

McGee: That’s it. Be unique. I just appreciate a good effort. You and I both grew up going to small college games, and you see it even there. You’re a Division II school with 2,000 students, so you can’t run through the “T” or pull off “Enter Sandman.” But you can paint up a banner. Your band can line it up. You can even get an inflatable tunnel to run through. Just own it.

Marty: That’s it. Get yourself a bouncy house. Everybody loves ’em a bouncy house.

New this week: David Byrne, The Amazing Race & Tommy Lee

Here’s a collection curated by The Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s arriving on TV streaming services and music platforms this week.

— Broadway is dark and most concert tours have been abandoned, but you can still feel the thrill of being inside a packed house in “ David Byrne’s American Utopia.” Spike Lee’s concert film of Byrne’s acclaimed stage show debuts Saturday at 8 p.m. on HBO and HBO Max, and it may be one of the best films of the year. Lee’s energetic direction combined with Byrne’s exuberant staging of Talking Heads classics and other songs makes for a concert film that stands on par with Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads classic “Stop Making Sense.”

— The timing of Aaron Sorkin s “The Trial of the Chicago 7” is remarkably good for a film set in 1969 and 1970. Sorkin’s drama, debuting Friday on Netflix after a brief run in theaters, is first and foremost a portrait of protest, in all its messiness, idealism and potential. Made with a starry ensemble including Mark Rylance, Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne and Michael Keaton, the film dramatizes — with Sorkin’s characteristic snappy dialogue and sweeping theatricality — the events surrounding the trial of anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In the seminal stand-off between counterculture and government, Sorkin (who wrote and directed) crafts a timely paean to dissent.

— Gretchen Sorin and Ric Burns’ “Driving While Black: Race, Space and Mobility in America” was, unfortunately, always going to be of the moment. The documentary, airing 9 p.m. Tuesday on PBS and streaming on PBS platforms, chronicles the experience of African Americans on the road beginning with the advent of the automobile. But is also stretches further back and forward to consider all forms of racist restrictions of movement for Black Americans, spanning Jim Crow-era laws to ’60s bus boycotts to contemporary policing. Says historian Christopher West in the film: “I think it’s really, really tough for the majority of Americans to begin to even understand the gut-wrenching horror that is driving in a racist society.”

— AP Film Writer Jake Coyle

— Kelly Clarkson is returning to host this year’s Billboard Music Awards which will air live on NBC on Wednesday night at 8 p.m. ET. Some of the performances will be live at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, while others were previously recorded. BTS, Post Malone, Bad Bunny, Sia, Alicia Keys, Luke Combs, Doja Cat, Kane Brown and Demi Lovato will hit the stage, where country music icon Garth Brooks and rapper-activist Killer Mike will receive special honors.

— Rocker Tommy Lee is in a collaborative state of mind on his new album, “Andro,” out Friday. The 14-track album, his first solo release in 15 years, includes guest appearances from multi-platinum hitmaker Post Malone, Josh Todd of Buckcherry, South African rapper Push Push, Canadian rocker Lukas Rossi, West Coast rapper Brooke Candy, singer-songwriter King Elle Noir and rapper Killvein, among others. The album also finds the Mötley Crüe veteran covering Prince’s “When You Were Mine.”

— AP Music Editor Mesfin Fekadu

— CBS’ “The Amazing Race,” with its especially welcome promise of armchair adventure, returns 9 p.m. EDT Wednesday. Eleven teams, including former NFL players DeAngelo Williams and Gary Barnidge and paired Olympians Kellie Wells-Brinkley and LaVonne Idlette, dash from locations in France, Germany, Kazakhstan, Brazil and elsewhere in the quest for bragging rights and a $1 million prize. The 32nd edition of the contest, taped before the coronavirus outbreak, pushed the series to the milestone of 1 million miles of worldwide travel.

— While many of us were making sourdough bread and, if we felt truly creative, posting pet videos, Hilary Weisman Graham (“Orange Is the New Black”) created “Social Distance” to illuminate our response to pandemic isolation. The Netflix anthology series, consisting of eight, 20-minute episodes, dramatizes the early days of the coronavirus quarantine, including our reliance on technology to maintain a version of emotional connection. Oscar Nunez (“The Office”), Asante Blackk (“This Is Us”) and Ali Ahn (“Orange Is the New Black”) are among the actors in the series out Thursday.

— Ready for a winter chill? Sundance Now’s true crime drama “Des” stars David Tennant (“Doctor Who”) as Dennis Nilsen, a serial killer who targeted young men, including the homeless. When he was arrested, Nilsen freely claimed responsibility for a shocking number of murders but couldn’t name his victims. Lacking forensic evidence, police began a daunting effort to identify the victims of the innocuous-looking British civil servant (who died in 2018 while serving a life sentence). The three-part “Des,” debuting Thursday on the streaming service, was a recent U.K. TV hit and drew raves for Tennant’s performance.

— AP Television Writer Lynn Elber

Catch up on AP’s entertainment coverage here: https://apnews.com/apf-entertainment.

New this week: David Byrne, The Amazing Race & Tommy Lee

Here’s a collection curated by The Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s arriving on TV streaming services and music platforms this week.

— Broadway is dark and most concert tours have been abandoned, but you can still feel the thrill of being inside a packed house in “ David Byrne’s American Utopia.” Spike Lee’s concert film of Byrne’s acclaimed stage show debuts Saturday at 8 p.m. on HBO and HBO Max, and it may be one of the best films of the year. Lee’s energetic direction combined with Byrne’s exuberant staging of Talking Heads classics and other songs makes for a concert film that stands on par with Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads classic “Stop Making Sense.”

— The timing of Aaron Sorkin s “The Trial of the Chicago 7” is remarkably good for a film set in 1969 and 1970. Sorkin’s drama, debuting Friday on Netflix after a brief run in theaters, is first and foremost a portrait of protest, in all its messiness, idealism and potential. Made with a starry ensemble including Mark Rylance, Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne and Michael Keaton, the film dramatizes — with Sorkin’s characteristic snappy dialogue and sweeping theatricality — the events surrounding the trial of anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In the seminal stand-off between counterculture and government, Sorkin (who wrote and directed) crafts a timely paean to dissent.

— Gretchen Sorin and Ric Burns’ “Driving While Black: Race, Space and Mobility in America” was, unfortunately, always going to be of the moment. The documentary, airing 9 p.m. Tuesday on PBS and streaming on PBS platforms, chronicles the experience of African Americans on the road beginning with the advent of the automobile. But is also stretches further back and forward to consider all forms of racist restrictions of movement for Black Americans, spanning Jim Crow-era laws to ’60s bus boycotts to contemporary policing. Says historian Christopher West in the film: “I think it’s really, really tough for the majority of Americans to begin to even understand the gut-wrenching horror that is driving in a racist society.”

— AP Film Writer Jake Coyle

— Kelly Clarkson is returning to host this year’s Billboard Music Awards which will air live on NBC on Wednesday night at 8 p.m. ET. Some of the performances will be live at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, while others were previously recorded. BTS, Post Malone, Bad Bunny, Sia, Alicia Keys, Luke Combs, Doja Cat, Kane Brown and Demi Lovato will hit the stage, where country music icon Garth Brooks and rapper-activist Killer Mike will receive special honors.

— Rocker Tommy Lee is in a collaborative state of mind on his new album, “Andro,” out Friday. The 14-track album, his first solo release in 15 years, includes guest appearances from multi-platinum hitmaker Post Malone, Josh Todd of Buckcherry, South African rapper Push Push, Canadian rocker Lukas Rossi, West Coast rapper Brooke Candy, singer-songwriter King Elle Noir and rapper Killvein, among others. The album also finds the Mötley Crüe veteran covering Prince’s “When You Were Mine.”

— AP Music Editor Mesfin Fekadu

— CBS’ “The Amazing Race,” with its especially welcome promise of armchair adventure, returns 9 p.m. EDT Wednesday. Eleven teams, including former NFL players DeAngelo Williams and Gary Barnidge and paired Olympians Kellie Wells-Brinkley and LaVonne Idlette, dash from locations in France, Germany, Kazakhstan, Brazil and elsewhere in the quest for bragging rights and a $1 million prize. The 32nd edition of the contest, taped before the coronavirus outbreak, pushed the series to the milestone of 1 million miles of worldwide travel.

— While many of us were making sourdough bread and, if we felt truly creative, posting pet videos, Hilary Weisman Graham (“Orange Is the New Black”) created “Social Distance” to illuminate our response to pandemic isolation. The Netflix anthology series, consisting of eight, 20-minute episodes, dramatizes the early days of the coronavirus quarantine, including our reliance on technology to maintain a version of emotional connection. Oscar Nunez (“The Office”), Asante Blackk (“This Is Us”) and Ali Ahn (“Orange Is the New Black”) are among the actors in the series out Thursday.

— Ready for a winter chill? Sundance Now’s true crime drama “Des” stars David Tennant (“Doctor Who”) as Dennis Nilsen, a serial killer who targeted young men, including the homeless. When he was arrested, Nilsen freely claimed responsibility for a shocking number of murders but couldn’t name his victims. Lacking forensic evidence, police began a daunting effort to identify the victims of the innocuous-looking British civil servant (who died in 2018 while serving a life sentence). The three-part “Des,” debuting Thursday on the streaming service, was a recent U.K. TV hit and drew raves for Tennant’s performance.

— AP Television Writer Lynn Elber

Catch up on AP’s entertainment coverage here: https://apnews.com/apf-entertainment.

Marty & McGee: Enter Sandman and the best college football entrances

Each week during the 2020 season, Marty Smith and Ryan McGee will celebrate all of the stuff that makes college football great: the sights, sounds, places and pageantry that make it the greatest sport in these United States of America. The same kind of conversations you can hear and see during Marty & McGee, Wednesdays on SEC Network/ESPN App (7 p.m. ET) and Saturday mornings on SEC Network/ESPN App and ESPN Radio (7-10 a.m. ET). This week, the dynamic duo get hyped up for the best stadium entrances they’ve ever seen.

McGee: Well, let’s start with the stadium entrances that hit us right in the heart, that take us back to our homelands and the home teams that made us fall in love with college football in the first place. You’ve been going to games at Virginia Tech since you were a little boy. I can’t think of a stadium atmosphere that has changed more in our lifetimes, from a sleepy little venue in the hills of Blacksburg, Virginia, to …

Marty: “Enter Sandman,” son! It was 2000 when they started that tradition and I will never forget the first time I heard that rocking through Lane Stadium. People might not realize, but the team leaves the football building and it’s a bit of walk into the stadium. Then the players go into a long tunnel that empties into the north end zone, so by the time they finally cut those Hokies loose, they are pumped.

McGee: Chills. Every single time.

Marty: My favorite “Enter Sandman” wasn’t even an entrance. It was Miami vs. Virginia Tech back when that game was everything. It determined the Big East title every season. Then they both moved to the ACC and it never slowed down. It was 2011, Miami was driving and there was a timeout with few seconds left and they hit play on “Enter Sandman.” I remember Mike Patrick, the legendary ESPN play-by-play man, said, “These people are losing their minds!” At our ESPN college football seminar a few years ago, I went and found Mike to tell him that I still find that moment and play it when I’m having a bad day.

McGee: For me, as a Tennessee grad, when the Pride of the Southland Band forms that Power T in the north end zone, and then it splits and the team runs through, it’s just unreal. I think that moment is why I ended up at Tennessee in the first place. I was going to Georgia, but my dad was officiating at game at Tennessee, so I went there with him. My college roommates always ask, “When did you first see the Big Orange Jesus?” In other words, when did you say, “This is bigger than me and I have to be a part of this!” For me, I saw it the first time I saw the Vols run through the T.

Marty: Speaking of orange, how about Clemson running down The Hill?

McGee: Well, speaking of Dad, the first time he officiated a game at Clemson, he came home that night and said to me and my brother, “Boys, we thought we had seen big-time college football. But now I have really seen it.” And he was talking about the Tigers coming down The Hill into 80,000 people with the “Tiger Rag” playing and a bazillion balloons sailing into the air.

Marty: I have been fortunate enough to see it so many times, and for some huge games. Brent Musburger called it “the most exciting 25 seconds in college football” — how they get on those buses, ride to the other side of the stadium and touch Howard’s Rock and the cannon goes off and here they come, son. But if I’m being honest with you, I always cringe a little.

McGee: Me too.

Marty: It kind of humps, right? There’s a landing in the middle and then it keeps going down. I remember Deshaun Watson, he and other guys would hit that landing and kind of jump up in the air and then keep going. And I could think was, good Lord, please don’t one of these guys blow a knee out right now.

McGee: The students are sitting on that hill and they part like the Red Sea to make room for the run. All it would take is for one frat boy to accidentally leave a plastic cup or his girlfriend to leave her bag sitting there, and one guy trips and it would be like one of those high school football entrance blooper videos that are all over YouTube.

Marty: Like when they make the paper banner for the team to run through, but the paper was too thick and everyone just wipes out.

McGee: Or the one cheerleader who gets caught in front of the banner and they all crash into her.

Marty: How about just down the road in South Carolina, the Gamecocks coming in to “2001.”

McGee: The first time I went to Williams-Brice Stadium, I was like, “OK, how great could it be? Playing classical music over the PA system with some smoke machines.” But it was amazing. And back then the upper deck was designed to sway.

Marty: Was it really?

McGee: Yeah, and that thing got to moving around and I was like, “What the hell is this?!”

Marty: I got to see one of the best entrances in person just last weekend. The Ramblin’ Wreck of Georgia Tech, and that 1930 Model T comes blazing in there. There weren’t but 10,000 fans allowed to attend the game, but by God, when that Ramblin’ Wreck came rolling in there, you knew a football game was about to start.

McGee: Speaking of motorized vehicles, I was pumped for College Gameday to be at Wake Forest for its season opener because America got to see another underrated entrance, when the Demon Deacon comes riding across the turf on that Harley-Davidson chopper like he’s Peter Fonda in “Easy Rider.”

Marty: How about down in Tallahassee when Osceola rides out there, face paint and all, and plants that spear at the 50-yard line? Son, that’ll get you ready. I’ve been to Florida State for games with Clemson and Miami, and that will never get old.

McGee: We were there together three years ago for the season opener on Labor Day night. They had us set up in the end zone on a little stage and three hours before kickoff that guy was on his horse and practicing. It was his first game doing it. He kept missing and then it clicked in.

Marty: You think he was nervous?

McGee: I asked him. He said, “No, I’m good. But then again, they haven’t set this spear on fire yet, so we’ll see.”

Marty (laughs): How about Michigan, when they run out at the 50-yard line, leaping in the air to slap that banner and run into the Big House? Or Notre Dame, when the team emerges after you know the players just smacked that “Play like a champion today” sign?

McGee: Or Autzen Stadium at Oregon, the loudest place I’ve ever been that wasn’t a racetrack. I was there with Oklahoma and when the Ducks ran out, Adrian Peterson looked at me and he said something about how damn loud it was. But I have no idea exactly what he said because, well, it was so damn loud.

Marty: Listen, I am not a huge European soccer fan, and I know they have their traditions when it comes to entrances and chants and all of that. There are great traditions in every sport. But it’s the pageantry and the uniqueness of this, something like a stadium entrance that is never the same from one place to the other. This is what separates college football from everything else. It’s unparalleled throughout sport.

McGee: That’s it. Be unique. I just appreciate a good effort. You and I both grew up going to small college games, and you see it even there. You’re a Division II school with 2,000 students, so you can’t run through the “T” or pull off “Enter Sandman.” But you can paint up a banner. Your band can line it up. You can even get an inflatable tunnel to run through. Just own it.

Marty: That’s it. Get yourself a bouncy house. Everybody loves ’em a bouncy house.

New this week: David Byrne, The Amazing Race & Tommy Lee

Here’s a collection curated by The Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s arriving on TV streaming services and music platforms this week.

— Broadway is dark and most concert tours have been abandoned, but you can still feel the thrill of being inside a packed house in “ David Byrne’s American Utopia.” Spike Lee’s concert film of Byrne’s acclaimed stage show debuts Saturday at 8 p.m. on HBO and HBO Max, and it may be one of the best films of the year. Lee’s energetic direction combined with Byrne’s exuberant staging of Talking Heads classics and other songs makes for a concert film that stands on par with Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads classic “Stop Making Sense.”

— The timing of Aaron Sorkin s “The Trial of the Chicago 7” is remarkably good for a film set in 1969 and 1970. Sorkin’s drama, debuting Friday on Netflix after a brief run in theaters, is first and foremost a portrait of protest, in all its messiness, idealism and potential. Made with a starry ensemble including Mark Rylance, Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne and Michael Keaton, the film dramatizes — with Sorkin’s characteristic snappy dialogue and sweeping theatricality — the events surrounding the trial of anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In the seminal stand-off between counterculture and government, Sorkin (who wrote and directed) crafts a timely paean to dissent.

— Gretchen Sorin and Ric Burns’ “Driving While Black: Race, Space and Mobility in America” was, unfortunately, always going to be of the moment. The documentary, airing 9 p.m. Tuesday on PBS and streaming on PBS platforms, chronicles the experience of African Americans on the road beginning with the advent of the automobile. But is also stretches further back and forward to consider all forms of racist restrictions of movement for Black Americans, spanning Jim Crow-era laws to ’60s bus boycotts to contemporary policing. Says historian Christopher West in the film: “I think it’s really, really tough for the majority of Americans to begin to even understand the gut-wrenching horror that is driving in a racist society.”

— AP Film Writer Jake Coyle

— Kelly Clarkson is returning to host this year’s Billboard Music Awards which will air live on NBC on Wednesday night at 8 p.m. ET. Some of the performances will be live at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, while others were previously recorded. BTS, Post Malone, Bad Bunny, Sia, Alicia Keys, Luke Combs, Doja Cat, Kane Brown and Demi Lovato will hit the stage, where country music icon Garth Brooks and rapper-activist Killer Mike will receive special honors.

— Rocker Tommy Lee is in a collaborative state of mind on his new album, “Andro,” out Friday. The 14-track album, his first solo release in 15 years, includes guest appearances from multi-platinum hitmaker Post Malone, Josh Todd of Buckcherry, South African rapper Push Push, Canadian rocker Lukas Rossi, West Coast rapper Brooke Candy, singer-songwriter King Elle Noir and rapper Killvein, among others. The album also finds the Mötley Crüe veteran covering Prince’s “When You Were Mine.”

— AP Music Editor Mesfin Fekadu

— CBS’ “The Amazing Race,” with its especially welcome promise of armchair adventure, returns 9 p.m. EDT Wednesday. Eleven teams, including former NFL players DeAngelo Williams and Gary Barnidge and paired Olympians Kellie Wells-Brinkley and LaVonne Idlette, dash from locations in France, Germany, Kazakhstan, Brazil and elsewhere in the quest for bragging rights and a $1 million prize. The 32nd edition of the contest, taped before the coronavirus outbreak, pushed the series to the milestone of 1 million miles of worldwide travel.

— While many of us were making sourdough bread and, if we felt truly creative, posting pet videos, Hilary Weisman Graham (“Orange Is the New Black”) created “Social Distance” to illuminate our response to pandemic isolation. The Netflix anthology series, consisting of eight, 20-minute episodes, dramatizes the early days of the coronavirus quarantine, including our reliance on technology to maintain a version of emotional connection. Oscar Nunez (“The Office”), Asante Blackk (“This Is Us”) and Ali Ahn (“Orange Is the New Black”) are among the actors in the series out Thursday.

— Ready for a winter chill? Sundance Now’s true crime drama “Des” stars David Tennant (“Doctor Who”) as Dennis Nilsen, a serial killer who targeted young men, including the homeless. When he was arrested, Nilsen freely claimed responsibility for a shocking number of murders but couldn’t name his victims. Lacking forensic evidence, police began a daunting effort to identify the victims of the innocuous-looking British civil servant (who died in 2018 while serving a life sentence). The three-part “Des,” debuting Thursday on the streaming service, was a recent U.K. TV hit and drew raves for Tennant’s performance.

— AP Television Writer Lynn Elber

Catch up on AP’s entertainment coverage here: https://apnews.com/apf-entertainment.

New this week: David Byrne, The Amazing Race & Tommy Lee

Here’s a collection curated by The Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s arriving on TV streaming services and music platforms this week.

— Broadway is dark and most concert tours have been abandoned, but you can still feel the thrill of being inside a packed house in “ David Byrne’s American Utopia.” Spike Lee’s concert film of Byrne’s acclaimed stage show debuts Saturday at 8 p.m. on HBO and HBO Max, and it may be one of the best films of the year. Lee’s energetic direction combined with Byrne’s exuberant staging of Talking Heads classics and other songs makes for a concert film that stands on par with Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads classic “Stop Making Sense.”

— The timing of Aaron Sorkin s “The Trial of the Chicago 7” is remarkably good for a film set in 1969 and 1970. Sorkin’s drama, debuting Friday on Netflix after a brief run in theaters, is first and foremost a portrait of protest, in all its messiness, idealism and potential. Made with a starry ensemble including Mark Rylance, Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne and Michael Keaton, the film dramatizes — with Sorkin’s characteristic snappy dialogue and sweeping theatricality — the events surrounding the trial of anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In the seminal stand-off between counterculture and government, Sorkin (who wrote and directed) crafts a timely paean to dissent.

— Gretchen Sorin and Ric Burns’ “Driving While Black: Race, Space and Mobility in America” was, unfortunately, always going to be of the moment. The documentary, airing 9 p.m. Tuesday on PBS and streaming on PBS platforms, chronicles the experience of African Americans on the road beginning with the advent of the automobile. But is also stretches further back and forward to consider all forms of racist restrictions of movement for Black Americans, spanning Jim Crow-era laws to ’60s bus boycotts to contemporary policing. Says historian Christopher West in the film: “I think it’s really, really tough for the majority of Americans to begin to even understand the gut-wrenching horror that is driving in a racist society.”

— AP Film Writer Jake Coyle

— Kelly Clarkson is returning to host this year’s Billboard Music Awards which will air live on NBC on Wednesday night at 8 p.m. ET. Some of the performances will be live at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, while others were previously recorded. BTS, Post Malone, Bad Bunny, Sia, Alicia Keys, Luke Combs, Doja Cat, Kane Brown and Demi Lovato will hit the stage, where country music icon Garth Brooks and rapper-activist Killer Mike will receive special honors.

— Rocker Tommy Lee is in a collaborative state of mind on his new album, “Andro,” out Friday. The 14-track album, his first solo release in 15 years, includes guest appearances from multi-platinum hitmaker Post Malone, Josh Todd of Buckcherry, South African rapper Push Push, Canadian rocker Lukas Rossi, West Coast rapper Brooke Candy, singer-songwriter King Elle Noir and rapper Killvein, among others. The album also finds the Mötley Crüe veteran covering Prince’s “When You Were Mine.”

— AP Music Editor Mesfin Fekadu

— CBS’ “The Amazing Race,” with its especially welcome promise of armchair adventure, returns 9 p.m. EDT Wednesday. Eleven teams, including former NFL players DeAngelo Williams and Gary Barnidge and paired Olympians Kellie Wells-Brinkley and LaVonne Idlette, dash from locations in France, Germany, Kazakhstan, Brazil and elsewhere in the quest for bragging rights and a $1 million prize. The 32nd edition of the contest, taped before the coronavirus outbreak, pushed the series to the milestone of 1 million miles of worldwide travel.

— While many of us were making sourdough bread and, if we felt truly creative, posting pet videos, Hilary Weisman Graham (“Orange Is the New Black”) created “Social Distance” to illuminate our response to pandemic isolation. The Netflix anthology series, consisting of eight, 20-minute episodes, dramatizes the early days of the coronavirus quarantine, including our reliance on technology to maintain a version of emotional connection. Oscar Nunez (“The Office”), Asante Blackk (“This Is Us”) and Ali Ahn (“Orange Is the New Black”) are among the actors in the series out Thursday.

— Ready for a winter chill? Sundance Now’s true crime drama “Des” stars David Tennant (“Doctor Who”) as Dennis Nilsen, a serial killer who targeted young men, including the homeless. When he was arrested, Nilsen freely claimed responsibility for a shocking number of murders but couldn’t name his victims. Lacking forensic evidence, police began a daunting effort to identify the victims of the innocuous-looking British civil servant (who died in 2018 while serving a life sentence). The three-part “Des,” debuting Thursday on the streaming service, was a recent U.K. TV hit and drew raves for Tennant’s performance.

— AP Television Writer Lynn Elber

Catch up on AP’s entertainment coverage here: https://apnews.com/apf-entertainment.

Los Angeles-area driver being chased by police stops to get gas

Broadly speaking, drivers running away from the police ditch their getaway car and continue on foot when they run out of gas. Los Angeles-area residents witnessed a rare exception to this rule when a man wanted in a theft pulled into a Chevron station and refueled while police officers were frantically searching for him.

News station NBC Los Angeles dispatched its chopper to follow the chase at about 5 p.m. Tuesday. The station said law enforcement officers were having a difficult time keeping up with the unidentified driver, and this head start gave him the confidence to pull into a gas station in El Monte. He had time to step out of his car, run inside to pay the cashier, and pump gas before speeding off. He even received the cash discount, according to NBC.

“He’s got plenty of time; so far, there are no officers approaching. No units there yet. We’re hoping that the [California Highway Patrol] is aware of the locator here,” the news anchor reported on live television.

With a full tank, the driver continued his getaway by traveling through several cities on the outskirts of Los Angeles, and later merging onto the 10 and 60 freeways. He disappeared after driving into a parking garage at approximately 6:25 p.m. Whether he was ultimately caught is unclear.

What’s nearly certain is that this man isn’t about to give up gasoline in favor of an electric car, which takes much longer to charge, anytime soon.

Why I Love the Norpro Nut Chopper

Kitchen ToolsOne Simply Terrific Thing

Forget a knife or food processor! This glass hand-cranked nut chopper is the best way to chop nuts.

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Welcome to One Simply Terrific Thing, our ongoing series highlighting the small tools and kitchen goods that make life better!

Are you nuts for nuts? I sure am, and not above deploying bad puns to prove it.

To aid me in achieving maximum nut consumption, I love the Norpro Nut Chopper. It’s a smart upgrade to an old-fashioned gadget you may very well have seen in your grandmother’s kitchen.

Why the Norpro Nut Chopper Is the Best

I am usually not a big fan of single-use tools; that this nut chopper has earned a nook in my cabinets for years is a mark of its handiness.

The Norpro Nut Chopper is the spitting image of an old relic I found at a thrift store when I was in my 20s that I still use out of stubborn sentimentality. It features a glass jar and stainless steel blades, and I highly recommend it over choppers made from plastic. The sturdy glass jar can withstand the stress from handling, while users report threads cracking in the jars of plastic models. (I remember customers returning plastic choppers to the cookware store I worked at years ago for the very same reason.)

It chops nuts better than either you or your food processor, and the nuts are consistently sized. When you load nuts into the top compartment, depending on which direction you crank the handle, the blade will chop coarsely or finely and the chopped nuts fall into the jar below.

One caveat about hand-cranked nut choppers is they’re not that great with almonds, which are perhaps a bit too hard for them to handle with ease. But that still leaves pistachios, cashews, pecans, walnuts, hazelnuts, macadamias, and peanuts for hours of nut-chopping pleasure. (PS: Kids love using this thing.)

As intended, I use the chopper for nuts only, and thus hardly ever wash it. The jar can go in the dishwasher if you like, but the top fares best simply wiped off.

Cheers to good tools!

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Sara Bir

Sara Bir a graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and the author of two cookbooks: The Fruit Forager’s Companion and Tasting Ohio. Past gigs include leading chocolate factory tours, slinging street cart sausages, and writing pop music criticism. Sara skates with her local roller derby team as Carrion the Librarian.

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Marty & McGee: Enter Sandman and the best college football entrances

Each week during the 2020 season, Marty Smith and Ryan McGee will celebrate all of the stuff that makes college football great: the sights, sounds, places and pageantry that make it the greatest sport in these United States of America. The same kind of conversations you can hear and see during Marty & McGee, Wednesdays on SEC Network/ESPN App (7 p.m. ET) and Saturday mornings on SEC Network/ESPN App and ESPN Radio (7-10 a.m. ET). This week, the dynamic duo get hyped up for the best stadium entrances they’ve ever seen.

McGee: Well, let’s start with the stadium entrances that hit us right in the heart, that take us back to our homelands and the home teams that made us fall in love with college football in the first place. You’ve been going to games at Virginia Tech since you were a little boy. I can’t think of a stadium atmosphere that has changed more in our lifetimes, from a sleepy little venue in the hills of Blacksburg, Virginia, to …

Marty: “Enter Sandman,” son! It was 2000 when they started that tradition and I will never forget the first time I heard that rocking through Lane Stadium. People might not realize, but the team leaves the football building and it’s a bit of walk into the stadium. Then the players go into a long tunnel that empties into the north end zone, so by the time they finally cut those Hokies loose, they are pumped.

McGee: Chills. Every single time.

Marty: My favorite “Enter Sandman” wasn’t even an entrance. It was Miami vs. Virginia Tech back when that game was everything. It determined the Big East title every season. Then they both moved to the ACC and it never slowed down. It was 2011, Miami was driving and there was a timeout with few seconds left and they hit play on “Enter Sandman.” I remember Mike Patrick, the legendary ESPN play-by-play man, said, “These people are losing their minds!” At our ESPN college football seminar a few years ago, I went and found Mike to tell him that I still find that moment and play it when I’m having a bad day.

McGee: For me, as a Tennessee grad, when the Pride of the Southland Band forms that Power T in the north end zone, and then it splits and the team runs through, it’s just unreal. I think that moment is why I ended up at Tennessee in the first place. I was going to Georgia, but my dad was officiating at game at Tennessee, so I went there with him. My college roommates always ask, “When did you first see the Big Orange Jesus?” In other words, when did you say, “This is bigger than me and I have to be a part of this!” For me, I saw it the first time I saw the Vols run through the T.

Marty: Speaking of orange, how about Clemson running down The Hill?

McGee: Well, speaking of Dad, the first time he officiated a game at Clemson, he came home that night and said to me and my brother, “Boys, we thought we had seen big-time college football. But now I have really seen it.” And he was talking about the Tigers coming down The Hill into 80,000 people with the “Tiger Rag” playing and a bazillion balloons sailing into the air.

Marty: I have been fortunate enough to see it so many times, and for some huge games. Brent Musburger called it “the most exciting 25 seconds in college football” — how they get on those buses, ride to the other side of the stadium and touch Howard’s Rock and the cannon goes off and here they come, son. But if I’m being honest with you, I always cringe a little.

McGee: Me too.

Marty: It kind of humps, right? There’s a landing in the middle and then it keeps going down. I remember Deshaun Watson, he and other guys would hit that landing and kind of jump up in the air and then keep going. And I could think was, good Lord, please don’t one of these guys blow a knee out right now.

McGee: The students are sitting on that hill and they part like the Red Sea to make room for the run. All it would take is for one frat boy to accidentally leave a plastic cup or his girlfriend to leave her bag sitting there, and one guy trips and it would be like one of those high school football entrance blooper videos that are all over YouTube.

Marty: Like when they make the paper banner for the team to run through, but the paper was too thick and everyone just wipes out.

McGee: Or the one cheerleader who gets caught in front of the banner and they all crash into her.

Marty: How about just down the road in South Carolina, the Gamecocks coming in to “2001.”

McGee: The first time I went to Williams-Brice Stadium, I was like, “OK, how great could it be? Playing classical music over the PA system with some smoke machines.” But it was amazing. And back then the upper deck was designed to sway.

Marty: Was it really?

McGee: Yeah, and that thing got to moving around and I was like, “What the hell is this?!”

Marty: I got to see one of the best entrances in person just last weekend. The Ramblin’ Wreck of Georgia Tech, and that 1930 Model T comes blazing in there. There weren’t but 10,000 fans allowed to attend the game, but by God, when that Ramblin’ Wreck came rolling in there, you knew a football game was about to start.

McGee: Speaking of motorized vehicles, I was pumped for College Gameday to be at Wake Forest for its season opener because America got to see another underrated entrance, when the Demon Deacon comes riding across the turf on that Harley-Davidson chopper like he’s Peter Fonda in “Easy Rider.”

Marty: How about down in Tallahassee when Osceola rides out there, face paint and all, and plants that spear at the 50-yard line? Son, that’ll get you ready. I’ve been to Florida State for games with Clemson and Miami, and that will never get old.

McGee: We were there together three years ago for the season opener on Labor Day night. They had us set up in the end zone on a little stage and three hours before kickoff that guy was on his horse and practicing. It was his first game doing it. He kept missing and then it clicked in.

Marty: You think he was nervous?

McGee: I asked him. He said, “No, I’m good. But then again, they haven’t set this spear on fire yet, so we’ll see.”

Marty (laughs): How about Michigan, when they run out at the 50-yard line, leaping in the air to slap that banner and run into the Big House? Or Notre Dame, when the team emerges after you know the players just smacked that “Play like a champion today” sign?

McGee: Or Autzen Stadium at Oregon, the loudest place I’ve ever been that wasn’t a racetrack. I was there with Oklahoma and when the Ducks ran out, Adrian Peterson looked at me and he said something about how damn loud it was. But I have no idea exactly what he said because, well, it was so damn loud.

Marty: Listen, I am not a huge European soccer fan, and I know they have their traditions when it comes to entrances and chants and all of that. There are great traditions in every sport. But it’s the pageantry and the uniqueness of this, something like a stadium entrance that is never the same from one place to the other. This is what separates college football from everything else. It’s unparalleled throughout sport.

McGee: That’s it. Be unique. I just appreciate a good effort. You and I both grew up going to small college games, and you see it even there. You’re a Division II school with 2,000 students, so you can’t run through the “T” or pull off “Enter Sandman.” But you can paint up a banner. Your band can line it up. You can even get an inflatable tunnel to run through. Just own it.

Marty: That’s it. Get yourself a bouncy house. Everybody loves ’em a bouncy house.

New this week: David Byrne, The Amazing Race & Tommy Lee

Here’s a collection curated by The Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s arriving on TV streaming services and music platforms this week.

— Broadway is dark and most concert tours have been abandoned, but you can still feel the thrill of being inside a packed house in “ David Byrne’s American Utopia.” Spike Lee’s concert film of Byrne’s acclaimed stage show debuts Saturday at 8 p.m. on HBO and HBO Max, and it may be one of the best films of the year. Lee’s energetic direction combined with Byrne’s exuberant staging of Talking Heads classics and other songs makes for a concert film that stands on par with Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads classic “Stop Making Sense.”

— The timing of Aaron Sorkin s “The Trial of the Chicago 7” is remarkably good for a film set in 1969 and 1970. Sorkin’s drama, debuting Friday on Netflix after a brief run in theaters, is first and foremost a portrait of protest, in all its messiness, idealism and potential. Made with a starry ensemble including Mark Rylance, Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne and Michael Keaton, the film dramatizes — with Sorkin’s characteristic snappy dialogue and sweeping theatricality — the events surrounding the trial of anti-war activists who were charged with conspiracy to incite a riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. In the seminal stand-off between counterculture and government, Sorkin (who wrote and directed) crafts a timely paean to dissent.

— Gretchen Sorin and Ric Burns’ “Driving While Black: Race, Space and Mobility in America” was, unfortunately, always going to be of the moment. The documentary, airing 9 p.m. Tuesday on PBS and streaming on PBS platforms, chronicles the experience of African Americans on the road beginning with the advent of the automobile. But is also stretches further back and forward to consider all forms of racist restrictions of movement for Black Americans, spanning Jim Crow-era laws to ’60s bus boycotts to contemporary policing. Says historian Christopher West in the film: “I think it’s really, really tough for the majority of Americans to begin to even understand the gut-wrenching horror that is driving in a racist society.”

— AP Film Writer Jake Coyle

— Kelly Clarkson is returning to host this year’s Billboard Music Awards which will air live on NBC on Wednesday night at 8 p.m. ET. Some of the performances will be live at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, while others were previously recorded. BTS, Post Malone, Bad Bunny, Sia, Alicia Keys, Luke Combs, Doja Cat, Kane Brown and Demi Lovato will hit the stage, where country music icon Garth Brooks and rapper-activist Killer Mike will receive special honors.

— Rocker Tommy Lee is in a collaborative state of mind on his new album, “Andro,” out Friday. The 14-track album, his first solo release in 15 years, includes guest appearances from multi-platinum hitmaker Post Malone, Josh Todd of Buckcherry, South African rapper Push Push, Canadian rocker Lukas Rossi, West Coast rapper Brooke Candy, singer-songwriter King Elle Noir and rapper Killvein, among others. The album also finds the Mötley Crüe veteran covering Prince’s “When You Were Mine.”

— AP Music Editor Mesfin Fekadu

— CBS’ “The Amazing Race,” with its especially welcome promise of armchair adventure, returns 9 p.m. EDT Wednesday. Eleven teams, including former NFL players DeAngelo Williams and Gary Barnidge and paired Olympians Kellie Wells-Brinkley and LaVonne Idlette, dash from locations in France, Germany, Kazakhstan, Brazil and elsewhere in the quest for bragging rights and a $1 million prize. The 32nd edition of the contest, taped before the coronavirus outbreak, pushed the series to the milestone of 1 million miles of worldwide travel.

— While many of us were making sourdough bread and, if we felt truly creative, posting pet videos, Hilary Weisman Graham (“Orange Is the New Black”) created “Social Distance” to illuminate our response to pandemic isolation. The Netflix anthology series, consisting of eight, 20-minute episodes, dramatizes the early days of the coronavirus quarantine, including our reliance on technology to maintain a version of emotional connection. Oscar Nunez (“The Office”), Asante Blackk (“This Is Us”) and Ali Ahn (“Orange Is the New Black”) are among the actors in the series out Thursday.

— Ready for a winter chill? Sundance Now’s true crime drama “Des” stars David Tennant (“Doctor Who”) as Dennis Nilsen, a serial killer who targeted young men, including the homeless. When he was arrested, Nilsen freely claimed responsibility for a shocking number of murders but couldn’t name his victims. Lacking forensic evidence, police began a daunting effort to identify the victims of the innocuous-looking British civil servant (who died in 2018 while serving a life sentence). The three-part “Des,” debuting Thursday on the streaming service, was a recent U.K. TV hit and drew raves for Tennant’s performance.

— AP Television Writer Lynn Elber

Catch up on AP’s entertainment coverage here: https://apnews.com/apf-entertainment.