Marty & McGee: Enter Sandman and the best college football entrances

Each week during the 2020 season, Marty Smith and Ryan McGee will celebrate all of the stuff that makes college football great: the sights, sounds, places and pageantry that make it the greatest sport in these United States of America. The same kind of conversations you can hear and see during Marty & McGee, Wednesdays on SEC Network/ESPN App (7 p.m. ET) and Saturday mornings on SEC Network/ESPN App and ESPN Radio (7-10 a.m. ET). This week, the dynamic duo get hyped up for the best stadium entrances they’ve ever seen.

McGee: Well, let’s start with the stadium entrances that hit us right in the heart, that take us back to our homelands and the home teams that made us fall in love with college football in the first place. You’ve been going to games at Virginia Tech since you were a little boy. I can’t think of a stadium atmosphere that has changed more in our lifetimes, from a sleepy little venue in the hills of Blacksburg, Virginia, to …

Marty: “Enter Sandman,” son! It was 2000 when they started that tradition and I will never forget the first time I heard that rocking through Lane Stadium. People might not realize, but the team leaves the football building and it’s a bit of walk into the stadium. Then the players go into a long tunnel that empties into the north end zone, so by the time they finally cut those Hokies loose, they are pumped.

McGee: Chills. Every single time.

Marty: My favorite “Enter Sandman” wasn’t even an entrance. It was Miami vs. Virginia Tech back when that game was everything. It determined the Big East title every season. Then they both moved to the ACC and it never slowed down. It was 2011, Miami was driving and there was a timeout with few seconds left and they hit play on “Enter Sandman.” I remember Mike Patrick, the legendary ESPN play-by-play man, said, “These people are losing their minds!” At our ESPN college football seminar a few years ago, I went and found Mike to tell him that I still find that moment and play it when I’m having a bad day.

McGee: For me, as a Tennessee grad, when the Pride of the Southland Band forms that Power T in the north end zone, and then it splits and the team runs through, it’s just unreal. I think that moment is why I ended up at Tennessee in the first place. I was going to Georgia, but my dad was officiating at game at Tennessee, so I went there with him. My college roommates always ask, “When did you first see the Big Orange Jesus?” In other words, when did you say, “This is bigger than me and I have to be a part of this!” For me, I saw it the first time I saw the Vols run through the T.

Marty: Speaking of orange, how about Clemson running down The Hill?

McGee: Well, speaking of Dad, the first time he officiated a game at Clemson, he came home that night and said to me and my brother, “Boys, we thought we had seen big-time college football. But now I have really seen it.” And he was talking about the Tigers coming down The Hill into 80,000 people with the “Tiger Rag” playing and a bazillion balloons sailing into the air.

Marty: I have been fortunate enough to see it so many times, and for some huge games. Brent Musburger called it “the most exciting 25 seconds in college football” — how they get on those buses, ride to the other side of the stadium and touch Howard’s Rock and the cannon goes off and here they come, son. But if I’m being honest with you, I always cringe a little.

McGee: Me too.

Marty: It kind of humps, right? There’s a landing in the middle and then it keeps going down. I remember Deshaun Watson, he and other guys would hit that landing and kind of jump up in the air and then keep going. And I could think was, good Lord, please don’t one of these guys blow a knee out right now.

McGee: The students are sitting on that hill and they part like the Red Sea to make room for the run. All it would take is for one frat boy to accidentally leave a plastic cup or his girlfriend to leave her bag sitting there, and one guy trips and it would be like one of those high school football entrance blooper videos that are all over YouTube.

Marty: Like when they make the paper banner for the team to run through, but the paper was too thick and everyone just wipes out.

McGee: Or the one cheerleader who gets caught in front of the banner and they all crash into her.

Marty: How about just down the road in South Carolina, the Gamecocks coming in to “2001.”

McGee: The first time I went to Williams-Brice Stadium, I was like, “OK, how great could it be? Playing classical music over the PA system with some smoke machines.” But it was amazing. And back then the upper deck was designed to sway.

Marty: Was it really?

McGee: Yeah, and that thing got to moving around and I was like, “What the hell is this?!”

Marty: I got to see one of the best entrances in person just last weekend. The Ramblin’ Wreck of Georgia Tech, and that 1930 Model T comes blazing in there. There weren’t but 10,000 fans allowed to attend the game, but by God, when that Ramblin’ Wreck came rolling in there, you knew a football game was about to start.

McGee: Speaking of motorized vehicles, I was pumped for College Gameday to be at Wake Forest for its season opener because America got to see another underrated entrance, when the Demon Deacon comes riding across the turf on that Harley-Davidson chopper like he’s Peter Fonda in “Easy Rider.”

Marty: How about down in Tallahassee when Osceola rides out there, face paint and all, and plants that spear at the 50-yard line? Son, that’ll get you ready. I’ve been to Florida State for games with Clemson and Miami, and that will never get old.

McGee: We were there together three years ago for the season opener on Labor Day night. They had us set up in the end zone on a little stage and three hours before kickoff that guy was on his horse and practicing. It was his first game doing it. He kept missing and then it clicked in.

Marty: You think he was nervous?

McGee: I asked him. He said, “No, I’m good. But then again, they haven’t set this spear on fire yet, so we’ll see.”

Marty (laughs): How about Michigan, when they run out at the 50-yard line, leaping in the air to slap that banner and run into the Big House? Or Notre Dame, when the team emerges after you know the players just smacked that “Play like a champion today” sign?

McGee: Or Autzen Stadium at Oregon, the loudest place I’ve ever been that wasn’t a racetrack. I was there with Oklahoma and when the Ducks ran out, Adrian Peterson looked at me and he said something about how damn loud it was. But I have no idea exactly what he said because, well, it was so damn loud.

Marty: Listen, I am not a huge European soccer fan, and I know they have their traditions when it comes to entrances and chants and all of that. There are great traditions in every sport. But it’s the pageantry and the uniqueness of this, something like a stadium entrance that is never the same from one place to the other. This is what separates college football from everything else. It’s unparalleled throughout sport.

McGee: That’s it. Be unique. I just appreciate a good effort. You and I both grew up going to small college games, and you see it even there. You’re a Division II school with 2,000 students, so you can’t run through the “T” or pull off “Enter Sandman.” But you can paint up a banner. Your band can line it up. You can even get an inflatable tunnel to run through. Just own it.

Marty: That’s it. Get yourself a bouncy house. Everybody loves ’em a bouncy house.

Los Angeles-area driver being chased by police stops to get gas

Broadly speaking, drivers running away from the police ditch their getaway car and continue on foot when they run out of gas. Los Angeles-area residents witnessed a rare exception to this rule when a man wanted in a theft pulled into a Chevron station and refueled while police officers were frantically searching for him.

News station NBC Los Angeles dispatched its chopper to follow the chase at about 5 p.m. Tuesday. The station said law enforcement officers were having a difficult time keeping up with the unidentified driver, and this head start gave him the confidence to pull into a gas station in El Monte. He had time to step out of his car, run inside to pay the cashier, and pump gas before speeding off. He even received the cash discount, according to NBC.

“He’s got plenty of time; so far, there are no officers approaching. No units there yet. We’re hoping that the [California Highway Patrol] is aware of the locator here,” the news anchor reported on live television.

With a full tank, the driver continued his getaway by traveling through several cities on the outskirts of Los Angeles, and later merging onto the 10 and 60 freeways. He disappeared after driving into a parking garage at approximately 6:25 p.m. Whether he was ultimately caught is unclear.

What’s nearly certain is that this man isn’t about to give up gasoline in favor of an electric car, which takes much longer to charge, anytime soon.

Why I Love the Norpro Nut Chopper

Kitchen ToolsOne Simply Terrific Thing

Forget a knife or food processor! This glass hand-cranked nut chopper is the best way to chop nuts.

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Welcome to One Simply Terrific Thing, our ongoing series highlighting the small tools and kitchen goods that make life better!

Are you nuts for nuts? I sure am, and not above deploying bad puns to prove it.

To aid me in achieving maximum nut consumption, I love the Norpro Nut Chopper. It’s a smart upgrade to an old-fashioned gadget you may very well have seen in your grandmother’s kitchen.

Why the Norpro Nut Chopper Is the Best

I am usually not a big fan of single-use tools; that this nut chopper has earned a nook in my cabinets for years is a mark of its handiness.

The Norpro Nut Chopper is the spitting image of an old relic I found at a thrift store when I was in my 20s that I still use out of stubborn sentimentality. It features a glass jar and stainless steel blades, and I highly recommend it over choppers made from plastic. The sturdy glass jar can withstand the stress from handling, while users report threads cracking in the jars of plastic models. (I remember customers returning plastic choppers to the cookware store I worked at years ago for the very same reason.)

It chops nuts better than either you or your food processor, and the nuts are consistently sized. When you load nuts into the top compartment, depending on which direction you crank the handle, the blade will chop coarsely or finely and the chopped nuts fall into the jar below.

One caveat about hand-cranked nut choppers is they’re not that great with almonds, which are perhaps a bit too hard for them to handle with ease. But that still leaves pistachios, cashews, pecans, walnuts, hazelnuts, macadamias, and peanuts for hours of nut-chopping pleasure. (PS: Kids love using this thing.)

As intended, I use the chopper for nuts only, and thus hardly ever wash it. The jar can go in the dishwasher if you like, but the top fares best simply wiped off.

Cheers to good tools!

This post may contain links to Amazon or other partners; your purchases via these links can benefit Simply Recipes.
Read more about our affiliate linking policy.

Sara Bir

Sara Bir a graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and the author of two cookbooks: The Fruit Forager’s Companion and Tasting Ohio. Past gigs include leading chocolate factory tours, slinging street cart sausages, and writing pop music criticism. Sara skates with her local roller derby team as Carrion the Librarian.

More from Sara

Marty & McGee: Enter Sandman and the best college football entrances

Each week during the 2020 season, Marty Smith and Ryan McGee will celebrate all of the stuff that makes college football great: the sights, sounds, places and pageantry that make it the greatest sport in these United States of America. The same kind of conversations you can hear and see during Marty & McGee, Wednesdays on SEC Network/ESPN App (7 p.m. ET) and Saturday mornings on SEC Network/ESPN App and ESPN Radio (7-10 a.m. ET). This week, the dynamic duo get hyped up for the best stadium entrances they’ve ever seen.

McGee: Well, let’s start with the stadium entrances that hit us right in the heart, that take us back to our homelands and the home teams that made us fall in love with college football in the first place. You’ve been going to games at Virginia Tech since you were a little boy. I can’t think of a stadium atmosphere that has changed more in our lifetimes, from a sleepy little venue in the hills of Blacksburg, Virginia, to …

Marty: “Enter Sandman,” son! It was 2000 when they started that tradition and I will never forget the first time I heard that rocking through Lane Stadium. People might not realize, but the team leaves the football building and it’s a bit of walk into the stadium. Then the players go into a long tunnel that empties into the north end zone, so by the time they finally cut those Hokies loose, they are pumped.

McGee: Chills. Every single time.

Marty: My favorite “Enter Sandman” wasn’t even an entrance. It was Miami vs. Virginia Tech back when that game was everything. It determined the Big East title every season. Then they both moved to the ACC and it never slowed down. It was 2011, Miami was driving and there was a timeout with few seconds left and they hit play on “Enter Sandman.” I remember Mike Patrick, the legendary ESPN play-by-play man, said, “These people are losing their minds!” At our ESPN college football seminar a few years ago, I went and found Mike to tell him that I still find that moment and play it when I’m having a bad day.

McGee: For me, as a Tennessee grad, when the Pride of the Southland Band forms that Power T in the north end zone, and then it splits and the team runs through, it’s just unreal. I think that moment is why I ended up at Tennessee in the first place. I was going to Georgia, but my dad was officiating at game at Tennessee, so I went there with him. My college roommates always ask, “When did you first see the Big Orange Jesus?” In other words, when did you say, “This is bigger than me and I have to be a part of this!” For me, I saw it the first time I saw the Vols run through the T.

Marty: Speaking of orange, how about Clemson running down The Hill?

McGee: Well, speaking of Dad, the first time he officiated a game at Clemson, he came home that night and said to me and my brother, “Boys, we thought we had seen big-time college football. But now I have really seen it.” And he was talking about the Tigers coming down The Hill into 80,000 people with the “Tiger Rag” playing and a bazillion balloons sailing into the air.

Marty: I have been fortunate enough to see it so many times, and for some huge games. Brent Musburger called it “the most exciting 25 seconds in college football” — how they get on those buses, ride to the other side of the stadium and touch Howard’s Rock and the cannon goes off and here they come, son. But if I’m being honest with you, I always cringe a little.

McGee: Me too.

Marty: It kind of humps, right? There’s a landing in the middle and then it keeps going down. I remember Deshaun Watson, he and other guys would hit that landing and kind of jump up in the air and then keep going. And I could think was, good Lord, please don’t one of these guys blow a knee out right now.

McGee: The students are sitting on that hill and they part like the Red Sea to make room for the run. All it would take is for one frat boy to accidentally leave a plastic cup or his girlfriend to leave her bag sitting there, and one guy trips and it would be like one of those high school football entrance blooper videos that are all over YouTube.

Marty: Like when they make the paper banner for the team to run through, but the paper was too thick and everyone just wipes out.

McGee: Or the one cheerleader who gets caught in front of the banner and they all crash into her.

Marty: How about just down the road in South Carolina, the Gamecocks coming in to “2001.”

McGee: The first time I went to Williams-Brice Stadium, I was like, “OK, how great could it be? Playing classical music over the PA system with some smoke machines.” But it was amazing. And back then the upper deck was designed to sway.

Marty: Was it really?

McGee: Yeah, and that thing got to moving around and I was like, “What the hell is this?!”

Marty: I got to see one of the best entrances in person just last weekend. The Ramblin’ Wreck of Georgia Tech, and that 1930 Model T comes blazing in there. There weren’t but 10,000 fans allowed to attend the game, but by God, when that Ramblin’ Wreck came rolling in there, you knew a football game was about to start.

McGee: Speaking of motorized vehicles, I was pumped for College Gameday to be at Wake Forest for its season opener because America got to see another underrated entrance, when the Demon Deacon comes riding across the turf on that Harley-Davidson chopper like he’s Peter Fonda in “Easy Rider.”

Marty: How about down in Tallahassee when Osceola rides out there, face paint and all, and plants that spear at the 50-yard line? Son, that’ll get you ready. I’ve been to Florida State for games with Clemson and Miami, and that will never get old.

McGee: We were there together three years ago for the season opener on Labor Day night. They had us set up in the end zone on a little stage and three hours before kickoff that guy was on his horse and practicing. It was his first game doing it. He kept missing and then it clicked in.

Marty: You think he was nervous?

McGee: I asked him. He said, “No, I’m good. But then again, they haven’t set this spear on fire yet, so we’ll see.”

Marty (laughs): How about Michigan, when they run out at the 50-yard line, leaping in the air to slap that banner and run into the Big House? Or Notre Dame, when the team emerges after you know the players just smacked that “Play like a champion today” sign?

McGee: Or Autzen Stadium at Oregon, the loudest place I’ve ever been that wasn’t a racetrack. I was there with Oklahoma and when the Ducks ran out, Adrian Peterson looked at me and he said something about how damn loud it was. But I have no idea exactly what he said because, well, it was so damn loud.

Marty: Listen, I am not a huge European soccer fan, and I know they have their traditions when it comes to entrances and chants and all of that. There are great traditions in every sport. But it’s the pageantry and the uniqueness of this, something like a stadium entrance that is never the same from one place to the other. This is what separates college football from everything else. It’s unparalleled throughout sport.

McGee: That’s it. Be unique. I just appreciate a good effort. You and I both grew up going to small college games, and you see it even there. You’re a Division II school with 2,000 students, so you can’t run through the “T” or pull off “Enter Sandman.” But you can paint up a banner. Your band can line it up. You can even get an inflatable tunnel to run through. Just own it.

Marty: That’s it. Get yourself a bouncy house. Everybody loves ’em a bouncy house.

Marty & McGee: Enter Sandman and the best college football entrances

Each week during the 2020 season, Marty Smith and Ryan McGee will celebrate all of the stuff that makes college football great: the sights, sounds, places and pageantry that make it the greatest sport in these United States of America. The same kind of conversations you can hear and see during Marty & McGee, Wednesdays on SEC Network/ESPN App (7 p.m. ET) and Saturday mornings on SEC Network/ESPN App and ESPN Radio (7-10 a.m. ET). This week, the dynamic duo get hyped up for the best stadium entrances they’ve ever seen.

McGee: Well, let’s start with the stadium entrances that hit us right in the heart, that take us back to our homelands and the home teams that made us fall in love with college football in the first place. You’ve been going to games at Virginia Tech since you were a little boy. I can’t think of a stadium atmosphere that has changed more in our lifetimes, from a sleepy little venue in the hills of Blacksburg, Virginia, to …

Marty: “Enter Sandman,” son! It was 2000 when they started that tradition and I will never forget the first time I heard that rocking through Lane Stadium. People might not realize, but the team leaves the football building and it’s a bit of walk into the stadium. Then the players go into a long tunnel that empties into the north end zone, so by the time they finally cut those Hokies loose, they are pumped.

McGee: Chills. Every single time.

Marty: My favorite “Enter Sandman” wasn’t even an entrance. It was Miami vs. Virginia Tech back when that game was everything. It determined the Big East title every season. Then they both moved to the ACC and it never slowed down. It was 2011, Miami was driving and there was a timeout with few seconds left and they hit play on “Enter Sandman.” I remember Mike Patrick, the legendary ESPN play-by-play man, said, “These people are losing their minds!” At our ESPN college football seminar a few years ago, I went and found Mike to tell him that I still find that moment and play it when I’m having a bad day.

McGee: For me, as a Tennessee grad, when the Pride of the Southland Band forms that Power T in the north end zone, and then it splits and the team runs through, it’s just unreal. I think that moment is why I ended up at Tennessee in the first place. I was going to Georgia, but my dad was officiating at game at Tennessee, so I went there with him. My college roommates always ask, “When did you first see the Big Orange Jesus?” In other words, when did you say, “This is bigger than me and I have to be a part of this!” For me, I saw it the first time I saw the Vols run through the T.

Marty: Speaking of orange, how about Clemson running down The Hill?

McGee: Well, speaking of Dad, the first time he officiated a game at Clemson, he came home that night and said to me and my brother, “Boys, we thought we had seen big-time college football. But now I have really seen it.” And he was talking about the Tigers coming down The Hill into 80,000 people with the “Tiger Rag” playing and a bazillion balloons sailing into the air.

Marty: I have been fortunate enough to see it so many times, and for some huge games. Brent Musburger called it “the most exciting 25 seconds in college football” — how they get on those buses, ride to the other side of the stadium and touch Howard’s Rock and the cannon goes off and here they come, son. But if I’m being honest with you, I always cringe a little.

McGee: Me too.

Marty: It kind of humps, right? There’s a landing in the middle and then it keeps going down. I remember Deshaun Watson, he and other guys would hit that landing and kind of jump up in the air and then keep going. And I could think was, good Lord, please don’t one of these guys blow a knee out right now.

McGee: The students are sitting on that hill and they part like the Red Sea to make room for the run. All it would take is for one frat boy to accidentally leave a plastic cup or his girlfriend to leave her bag sitting there, and one guy trips and it would be like one of those high school football entrance blooper videos that are all over YouTube.

Marty: Like when they make the paper banner for the team to run through, but the paper was too thick and everyone just wipes out.

McGee: Or the one cheerleader who gets caught in front of the banner and they all crash into her.

Marty: How about just down the road in South Carolina, the Gamecocks coming in to “2001.”

McGee: The first time I went to Williams-Brice Stadium, I was like, “OK, how great could it be? Playing classical music over the PA system with some smoke machines.” But it was amazing. And back then the upper deck was designed to sway.

Marty: Was it really?

McGee: Yeah, and that thing got to moving around and I was like, “What the hell is this?!”

Marty: I got to see one of the best entrances in person just last weekend. The Ramblin’ Wreck of Georgia Tech, and that 1930 Model T comes blazing in there. There weren’t but 10,000 fans allowed to attend the game, but by God, when that Ramblin’ Wreck came rolling in there, you knew a football game was about to start.

McGee: Speaking of motorized vehicles, I was pumped for College Gameday to be at Wake Forest for its season opener because America got to see another underrated entrance, when the Demon Deacon comes riding across the turf on that Harley-Davidson chopper like he’s Peter Fonda in “Easy Rider.”

Marty: How about down in Tallahassee when Osceola rides out there, face paint and all, and plants that spear at the 50-yard line? Son, that’ll get you ready. I’ve been to Florida State for games with Clemson and Miami, and that will never get old.

McGee: We were there together three years ago for the season opener on Labor Day night. They had us set up in the end zone on a little stage and three hours before kickoff that guy was on his horse and practicing. It was his first game doing it. He kept missing and then it clicked in.

Marty: You think he was nervous?

McGee: I asked him. He said, “No, I’m good. But then again, they haven’t set this spear on fire yet, so we’ll see.”

Marty (laughs): How about Michigan, when they run out at the 50-yard line, leaping in the air to slap that banner and run into the Big House? Or Notre Dame, when the team emerges after you know the players just smacked that “Play like a champion today” sign?

McGee: Or Autzen Stadium at Oregon, the loudest place I’ve ever been that wasn’t a racetrack. I was there with Oklahoma and when the Ducks ran out, Adrian Peterson looked at me and he said something about how damn loud it was. But I have no idea exactly what he said because, well, it was so damn loud.

Marty: Listen, I am not a huge European soccer fan, and I know they have their traditions when it comes to entrances and chants and all of that. There are great traditions in every sport. But it’s the pageantry and the uniqueness of this, something like a stadium entrance that is never the same from one place to the other. This is what separates college football from everything else. It’s unparalleled throughout sport.

McGee: That’s it. Be unique. I just appreciate a good effort. You and I both grew up going to small college games, and you see it even there. You’re a Division II school with 2,000 students, so you can’t run through the “T” or pull off “Enter Sandman.” But you can paint up a banner. Your band can line it up. You can even get an inflatable tunnel to run through. Just own it.

Marty: That’s it. Get yourself a bouncy house. Everybody loves ’em a bouncy house.

Seager homers again as Dodgers force Game 7 – TSN

ARLINGTON, Texas — Corey Seager‘s sweet swing. Walker Buehler‘s calm. Kenley Jansen‘s resurgence.

The Los Angeles Dodgers got what they needed — again.

“We did what we had to do to force a Game 7,” Justin Turner said.

They sure did.

Seager homered again, Buehler pitched six scoreless innings and the Dodgers beat the Atlanta Braves 3-1 on Saturday to send the NL Championship Series to a winner-take-all finale.

Los Angeles avoided elimination for the second time in less than 24 hours, staying alive in its pursuit of a third pennant in four years. It hasn’t won a championship since 1988.

“I’m still sort of recovering from this one, but already thinking about Game 7,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “That’s what you live for.”

Turner also homered for Los Angeles, and Jansen threw a six-pitch ninth for his 18th career post-season save.

The NL West and East champions play again Sunday night, with the potential for two rookie starters in a Game 7 for the first time in big league history. The winner gets the Tampa Bay Rays in the World Series.

Roberts was keeping his options open for his starting pitcher while the Braves plan to go with rookie right-hander Ian Anderson, who has thrown 15 2/3 scoreless innings in his three post-season starts. Tony Gonsolin and three-time NL Cy Young Award winner Clayton Kershaw are among the possibilities for Los Angeles.

“Shoot, we’ll go out there and let ’er fly. A Game 7 is another baseball game,” Atlanta manager Brian Snitker said. “You have to treat it as such.”

The Braves were hoping to celebrate Snitker’s 65th birthday Saturday with the franchise’s first World Series berth since 1999. But Max Fried took his first loss all year, working into the seventh inning after surrendering three runs during a rocky first.

Buehler, using Stan’s Rodeo Ointment to deal with bothersome blisters, threw 65 of his 89 pitches for strikes. He allowed seven hits while striking out six without a walk.

After Atlanta loaded the bases with three singles in a row to start the top of second — the last hit by his Vanderbilt roommate Dansby Swanson — the right-hander really brought the heat, with 10 consecutive fastballs to get out of the jam.

Austin Riley struck out on a 98.7 mph pitch before Nick Markakis took a called third strike on 99.7 mph. Cristian Pache, the 21-year-old rookie who had an RBI in each of his first four NLCS starts, was retired on an inning-ending groundout.

“His mound presence is just unbelievable,” Turner said.

Buehler said he has never felt that calm in a game, especially a situation like that. He credited catcher Austin Barnes — and past experiences.

“I’ve failed in those moments. I’ve been through it and I’ve been good after it, but that failure doesn’t really scare me anymore,” Buehler said. “The more times you go through things like that, your heartbeat kind of changes and can slow down.”

It was a much different result than Buehler’s post-season debut two years ago in Game 3 of the NL Division Series, when the Braves also loaded the bases against him in the second inning. After a walk drove in a run, Ronald Acuña Jr. hit a grand slam on the next pitch.

Fried, who struck out five and walked four in 6 2/3 innings, allowed only two homers in his 11 starts while going 7-0 during the regular season. But the Dodgers went deep twice in three pitches in the first.

Seager pulled a towering shot to right on a 73-mph curveball, and Turner connected on a 93-mph sinker that went 418 feet to straightaway centre. Max Muncy walked and scored after back-to-back singles by Will Smith and Cody Bellinger that made it 3-0.

“I came out in a game like this and kind of put us behind the eight-ball real quick.” Fried said. “To me, that’s unacceptable.”

Seager, who homered twice in Game 5 on Friday night, has NLCS records with five homers and 11 RBIs, and still a game to play. His six homers overall are already a Dodgers post-season record.

Mookie Betts, the 2018 AL MVP and first-year Dodger, made a l eaping catch against the right field wall to end the fifth. While it wouldn’t have been a homer, it robbed Marcell Ozuna of extra bases, and the Braves a likely run.

Betts let out a emphatic shout while pumping both fists, then celebrated with Bellinger while Buehler held his right arm high in the air.

With Buehler out of the game, Nick Markakis greeted Blake Treinen with triple to right leading off off the seventh and came home on a one-out double by Ronald Acuña Jr.

But the Dodgers’ bullpen closed it out from there, with Jansen finishing the victory in an encouraging performance heading into Game 7.

It was Jansen’s first save chance in five appearances since closing out the Dodgers’ first playoff win this season in the wild-card round. He struck out the side on 12 pitches in Friday night’s 7-3 win.

“Two huge outings, not only for us, but him personally, you can just see the confidence he has on the mound attacking guys,” Turner said. “That’s the Kenley Jansen I and all of us in there all know and love.”

STRANGE PLAY

Ozzie Albies hit a slow chopper down the first-base line in the Braves sixth that was fielded by Muncy, who then made the tag before the ball popped out. Albies thought he was out and never touched first base. Muncy tossed the ball to Buehler, who tagged the runner already heading back to the Atlanta dugout.

GAME 7s

The Dodgers are playing in a Game 7 for the third time in four years. They won 5-1 at Milwaukee in the deciding game of the 2018 NLCS, after losing 5-1 at home to the Houston Astros in Game 7 of the 2017 World Series. Atlanta hasn’t played in a Game 7 since its 15-0 win over St. Louis in the 1996 NLCS.

SHORT HOPS

The 14 homers by Los Angeles are tied for the most in an NLCS, and two behind the 2008 Tampa Bay Rays for the most in any LCS. … Only once before have the Dodgers won three consecutive potential elimination games to take a series. That was in the best-of-five NL Division Series in 1981. They won the World Series that year.

UP NEXT

Braves: Anderson needed 85 pitches to get through four innings in Game 2, when he allowed only one hit with five strikeouts. But he walked five batters in a game Atlanta held on to win 8-7.

Dodgers: Gonsolin’s post-season debut starting Game 2 came after Kershaw was scratched because of back spasms. Gonsolin struck out seven but allowed five runs in 4 1/3 innings. Kershaw pitched Game 4 on Thursday.

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More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Marty & McGee: Enter Sandman and the best college football entrances

Each week during the 2020 season, Marty Smith and Ryan McGee will celebrate all of the stuff that makes college football great: the sights, sounds, places and pageantry that make it the greatest sport in these United States of America. The same kind of conversations you can hear and see during Marty & McGee, Wednesdays on SEC Network/ESPN App (7 p.m. ET) and Saturday mornings on SEC Network/ESPN App and ESPN Radio (7-10 a.m. ET). This week, the dynamic duo get hyped up for the best stadium entrances they’ve ever seen.

McGee: Well, let’s start with the stadium entrances that hit us right in the heart, that take us back to our homelands and the home teams that made us fall in love with college football in the first place. You’ve been going to games at Virginia Tech since you were a little boy. I can’t think of a stadium atmosphere that has changed more in our lifetimes, from a sleepy little venue in the hills of Blacksburg, Virginia, to …

Marty: “Enter Sandman,” son! It was 2000 when they started that tradition and I will never forget the first time I heard that rocking through Lane Stadium. People might not realize, but the team leaves the football building and it’s a bit of walk into the stadium. Then the players go into a long tunnel that empties into the north end zone, so by the time they finally cut those Hokies loose, they are pumped.

McGee: Chills. Every single time.

Marty: My favorite “Enter Sandman” wasn’t even an entrance. It was Miami vs. Virginia Tech back when that game was everything. It determined the Big East title every season. Then they both moved to the ACC and it never slowed down. It was 2011, Miami was driving and there was a timeout with few seconds left and they hit play on “Enter Sandman.” I remember Mike Patrick, the legendary ESPN play-by-play man, said, “These people are losing their minds!” At our ESPN college football seminar a few years ago, I went and found Mike to tell him that I still find that moment and play it when I’m having a bad day.

McGee: For me, as a Tennessee grad, when the Pride of the Southland Band forms that Power T in the north end zone, and then it splits and the team runs through, it’s just unreal. I think that moment is why I ended up at Tennessee in the first place. I was going to Georgia, but my dad was officiating at game at Tennessee, so I went there with him. My college roommates always ask, “When did you first see the Big Orange Jesus?” In other words, when did you say, “This is bigger than me and I have to be a part of this!” For me, I saw it the first time I saw the Vols run through the T.

Marty: Speaking of orange, how about Clemson running down The Hill?

McGee: Well, speaking of Dad, the first time he officiated a game at Clemson, he came home that night and said to me and my brother, “Boys, we thought we had seen big-time college football. But now I have really seen it.” And he was talking about the Tigers coming down The Hill into 80,000 people with the “Tiger Rag” playing and a bazillion balloons sailing into the air.

Marty: I have been fortunate enough to see it so many times, and for some huge games. Brent Musburger called it “the most exciting 25 seconds in college football” — how they get on those buses, ride to the other side of the stadium and touch Howard’s Rock and the cannon goes off and here they come, son. But if I’m being honest with you, I always cringe a little.

McGee: Me too.

Marty: It kind of humps, right? There’s a landing in the middle and then it keeps going down. I remember Deshaun Watson, he and other guys would hit that landing and kind of jump up in the air and then keep going. And I could think was, good Lord, please don’t one of these guys blow a knee out right now.

McGee: The students are sitting on that hill and they part like the Red Sea to make room for the run. All it would take is for one frat boy to accidentally leave a plastic cup or his girlfriend to leave her bag sitting there, and one guy trips and it would be like one of those high school football entrance blooper videos that are all over YouTube.

Marty: Like when they make the paper banner for the team to run through, but the paper was too thick and everyone just wipes out.

McGee: Or the one cheerleader who gets caught in front of the banner and they all crash into her.

Marty: How about just down the road in South Carolina, the Gamecocks coming in to “2001.”

McGee: The first time I went to Williams-Brice Stadium, I was like, “OK, how great could it be? Playing classical music over the PA system with some smoke machines.” But it was amazing. And back then the upper deck was designed to sway.

Marty: Was it really?

McGee: Yeah, and that thing got to moving around and I was like, “What the hell is this?!”

Marty: I got to see one of the best entrances in person just last weekend. The Ramblin’ Wreck of Georgia Tech, and that 1930 Model T comes blazing in there. There weren’t but 10,000 fans allowed to attend the game, but by God, when that Ramblin’ Wreck came rolling in there, you knew a football game was about to start.

McGee: Speaking of motorized vehicles, I was pumped for College Gameday to be at Wake Forest for its season opener because America got to see another underrated entrance, when the Demon Deacon comes riding across the turf on that Harley-Davidson chopper like he’s Peter Fonda in “Easy Rider.”

Marty: How about down in Tallahassee when Osceola rides out there, face paint and all, and plants that spear at the 50-yard line? Son, that’ll get you ready. I’ve been to Florida State for games with Clemson and Miami, and that will never get old.

McGee: We were there together three years ago for the season opener on Labor Day night. They had us set up in the end zone on a little stage and three hours before kickoff that guy was on his horse and practicing. It was his first game doing it. He kept missing and then it clicked in.

Marty: You think he was nervous?

McGee: I asked him. He said, “No, I’m good. But then again, they haven’t set this spear on fire yet, so we’ll see.”

Marty (laughs): How about Michigan, when they run out at the 50-yard line, leaping in the air to slap that banner and run into the Big House? Or Notre Dame, when the team emerges after you know the players just smacked that “Play like a champion today” sign?

McGee: Or Autzen Stadium at Oregon, the loudest place I’ve ever been that wasn’t a racetrack. I was there with Oklahoma and when the Ducks ran out, Adrian Peterson looked at me and he said something about how damn loud it was. But I have no idea exactly what he said because, well, it was so damn loud.

Marty: Listen, I am not a huge European soccer fan, and I know they have their traditions when it comes to entrances and chants and all of that. There are great traditions in every sport. But it’s the pageantry and the uniqueness of this, something like a stadium entrance that is never the same from one place to the other. This is what separates college football from everything else. It’s unparalleled throughout sport.

McGee: That’s it. Be unique. I just appreciate a good effort. You and I both grew up going to small college games, and you see it even there. You’re a Division II school with 2,000 students, so you can’t run through the “T” or pull off “Enter Sandman.” But you can paint up a banner. Your band can line it up. You can even get an inflatable tunnel to run through. Just own it.

Marty: That’s it. Get yourself a bouncy house. Everybody loves ’em a bouncy house.

Braves break it open with 6-run inning, knock out Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers to move one win from World Series

ARLINGTON, Texas – Bryse Wilson was just 10 years old the first time Clayton Kershaw set foot in a National League Championship Series, the 20-year-old southpaw embarking on a postseason career that he’d have no idea would be so torturous, and the Little Leaguer growing up in North Carolina unable to fathom he’d someday be the one adding to the misery.

Their paths crossed on a windswept Thursday night at Globe Life Field, and little could Kershaw imagine his October nightmares would be extended by such an unlikely adversary.

Making just his eighth major league start and first playoff appearance, Wilson cooled off a Dodgers lineup that scored 15 runs the night before, holding them to one hit in six innings and enabling the Braves to await an October inevitability.

It finally came in the bottom of the sixth, when an innocuous infield chopper kick-started Kershaw’s latest playoff misadventure. It ended six runs later with the Braves on the verge of an NL pennant and the Dodgers, the deepest and most talented team in the game, pondering another winter far longer than they’d prefer.

The Braves’ 10-2 victory, powered by Marcell Ozuna’s two home runs, four hits and four RBI, vaulted them to a 3-1 lead in this NLCS while wondering just how many fistfuls of house money they might claim. Friday night, they’ll likely lean on a cadre of pitchers to piece together nine innings in a Game 5 that could send them to the World Series.

The Dodgers will do the same, starting with rookie fireballer Dustin May and a more rested bullpen to save their season. Ostensibly, the Dodgers would have the advantage.

Marcell Ozuna went 4-for-5 in Game 4 of the NLCS against the Dodgers.

Yet things looked great for them on paper in Game 4, as well. Wilson brought a 5.91 career ERA into the game and, over parts of three seasons had only completed six innings once. While manager Brian Snitker professed confidence in Wilson, he confessed after Game 4 the bar was appropriately low.

“If he went four innings, I’d have been happy, to be honest,” says Snitker. “A young kid like this who hadn’t pitched in three weeks…Six was an unbelievable plus.

“That was just an unbelievable job.”

Particularly considering the Dodgers set a postseason record with their 11 runs in Game 3’s first inning, and tied an NLCS record with 15 runs in the season-saving romp. They batted for 32 minutes in that record-setting first inning.

Thursday night, Wilson retired the side on nine pitches.

And off he was on his unlikely adventure, striking out five Dodgers, yielding only Edwin Rios’ third-inning home run, and aided by a stiff breeze blowing in from center field that knocked down more than one ball that could have been extra bases.

“I honestly don’t think he was too fazed he was facing Kershaw,” says Braves reliever Chris Martin. “That’s a great arm over there but he focused on what he needed.”

Then, there was Kershaw.

His many October wounds are occasionally circumstantial, often self-inflicted, usually aided and abetted by questionable managerial moves and reliever malpractice behind him.

ALCS: Walk-off home run keeps Astros alive in Game 5

GAME 3 REWIND: Dodgers set postseason record with 11 first-inning runs

In Game 4, all of the above applied.

Kershaw’s lone blemish through five innings was a thunderous, game-tying home run yielded to Marcell Ozuna in the fourth inning. His slider was biting just enough and his curveball its usually tight self, both sufficiently keeping Atlanta’s powerful lineup off his fastball that, at age 32, barely touches 90 mph.

And then, poof.

The sixth began with Ronald Acuña Jr. chopping a ball behind the mound that bounced lazily past Kershaw’s extended glove. Kiké Hernandez could not make the do-or-die play and his throwing error put the go-ahead run at second.

Ozuna was due up third, but Dodgers manager Dave Roberts did not feel an urgency to line up a right-hander for him. Brusdar Graterol, clad in a sweatshirt, did some dry throws off a bullpen mound, but that was it.

Besides, Freddie Freeman, the likely NL MVP, was next, and that was Kershaw’s guy. Freeman, though, won this lefty-on-lefty battle, pulling a double down the left-field line to drive in Acuña.

By now, Graterol was throwing, but Kershaw would face Ozuna. It was still a 2-1 game; some proactive bullpen management for a lefty starter with a fading fastball might have been the move.

Instead, Ozuna torched an RBI double, finishing Kershaw but only kick-starting the damage.

Graterol gave up three consecutive hits, including a two-run double by Dansby Swanson and RBI single from Austin Riley, and was yanked. By inning’s end, it was 7-1.

By night’s end, Kershaw would have an 11-12 career postseason record. His overall 2020 line – a 2-1 record, a 3.32 ERA, 23 strikeouts to two walks – doesn’t look that bad.

It will do nothing to erase the annual October image of him in the dugout after an early hook or a precipitous fall, flummoxed and miserable.

The Braves? They are awaiting a coronation, one win away from their first World Series since 1999 and aces Max Fried and Ian Anderson ready should Game 5 not go their way.

Wilson put them in that position, starting his day with his girlfriend noting how quiet he was, relaxing once he got into the clubhouse cocoon of his teammates and finally, at night’s end, sharing the glory with his parents. 

He was the third consecutive Braves rookie to start in this series, following fellow 2016 draftee Anderson and Kyle Wright, a 2017 selection who was on the wrong end of the Dodgers’ 15-run inning in Game 3. 

No matter. Wilson replicated Wright’s game plan and attacked the Dodgers, but masterfully commanded his pitches. The rookie trio now are on the doorstep of forming the core of a World Series rotation.

“It means so much,” says Wilson, “especially us coming up together in the minor leagues, it means the world we are able to do this together.” 

They’re just getting started. Kershaw might counsel them to seize the moment, because the years go quickly and the hill only gets steeper. 

Marty & McGee: Enter Sandman and the best college football entrances

Each week during the 2020 season, Marty Smith and Ryan McGee will celebrate all of the stuff that makes college football great: the sights, sounds, places and pageantry that make it the greatest sport in these United States of America. The same kind of conversations you can hear and see during Marty & McGee, Wednesdays on SEC Network/ESPN App (7 p.m. ET) and Saturday mornings on SEC Network/ESPN App and ESPN Radio (7-10 a.m. ET). This week, the dynamic duo get hyped up for the best stadium entrances they’ve ever seen.

McGee: Well, let’s start with the stadium entrances that hit us right in the heart, that take us back to our homelands and the home teams that made us fall in love with college football in the first place. You’ve been going to games at Virginia Tech since you were a little boy. I can’t think of a stadium atmosphere that has changed more in our lifetimes, from a sleepy little venue in the hills of Blacksburg, Virginia, to …

Marty: “Enter Sandman,” son! It was 2000 when they started that tradition and I will never forget the first time I heard that rocking through Lane Stadium. People might not realize, but the team leaves the football building and it’s a bit of walk into the stadium. Then the players go into a long tunnel that empties into the north end zone, so by the time they finally cut those Hokies loose, they are pumped.

McGee: Chills. Every single time.

Marty: My favorite “Enter Sandman” wasn’t even an entrance. It was Miami vs. Virginia Tech back when that game was everything. It determined the Big East title every season. Then they both moved to the ACC and it never slowed down. It was 2011, Miami was driving and there was a timeout with few seconds left and they hit play on “Enter Sandman.” I remember Mike Patrick, the legendary ESPN play-by-play man, said, “These people are losing their minds!” At our ESPN college football seminar a few years ago, I went and found Mike to tell him that I still find that moment and play it when I’m having a bad day.

McGee: For me, as a Tennessee grad, when the Pride of the Southland Band forms that Power T in the north end zone, and then it splits and the team runs through, it’s just unreal. I think that moment is why I ended up at Tennessee in the first place. I was going to Georgia, but my dad was officiating at game at Tennessee, so I went there with him. My college roommates always ask, “When did you first see the Big Orange Jesus?” In other words, when did you say, “This is bigger than me and I have to be a part of this!” For me, I saw it the first time I saw the Vols run through the T.

Marty: Speaking of orange, how about Clemson running down The Hill?

McGee: Well, speaking of Dad, the first time he officiated a game at Clemson, he came home that night and said to me and my brother, “Boys, we thought we had seen big-time college football. But now I have really seen it.” And he was talking about the Tigers coming down The Hill into 80,000 people with the “Tiger Rag” playing and a bazillion balloons sailing into the air.

Marty: I have been fortunate enough to see it so many times, and for some huge games. Brent Musburger called it “the most exciting 25 seconds in college football” — how they get on those buses, ride to the other side of the stadium and touch Howard’s Rock and the cannon goes off and here they come, son. But if I’m being honest with you, I always cringe a little.

McGee: Me too.

Marty: It kind of humps, right? There’s a landing in the middle and then it keeps going down. I remember Deshaun Watson, he and other guys would hit that landing and kind of jump up in the air and then keep going. And I could think was, good Lord, please don’t one of these guys blow a knee out right now.

McGee: The students are sitting on that hill and they part like the Red Sea to make room for the run. All it would take is for one frat boy to accidentally leave a plastic cup or his girlfriend to leave her bag sitting there, and one guy trips and it would be like one of those high school football entrance blooper videos that are all over YouTube.

Marty: Like when they make the paper banner for the team to run through, but the paper was too thick and everyone just wipes out.

McGee: Or the one cheerleader who gets caught in front of the banner and they all crash into her.

Marty: How about just down the road in South Carolina, the Gamecocks coming in to “2001.”

McGee: The first time I went to Williams-Brice Stadium, I was like, “OK, how great could it be? Playing classical music over the PA system with some smoke machines.” But it was amazing. And back then the upper deck was designed to sway.

Marty: Was it really?

McGee: Yeah, and that thing got to moving around and I was like, “What the hell is this?!”

Marty: I got to see one of the best entrances in person just last weekend. The Ramblin’ Wreck of Georgia Tech, and that 1930 Model T comes blazing in there. There weren’t but 10,000 fans allowed to attend the game, but by God, when that Ramblin’ Wreck came rolling in there, you knew a football game was about to start.

McGee: Speaking of motorized vehicles, I was pumped for College Gameday to be at Wake Forest for its season opener because America got to see another underrated entrance, when the Demon Deacon comes riding across the turf on that Harley-Davidson chopper like he’s Peter Fonda in “Easy Rider.”

Marty: How about down in Tallahassee when Osceola rides out there, face paint and all, and plants that spear at the 50-yard line? Son, that’ll get you ready. I’ve been to Florida State for games with Clemson and Miami, and that will never get old.

McGee: We were there together three years ago for the season opener on Labor Day night. They had us set up in the end zone on a little stage and three hours before kickoff that guy was on his horse and practicing. It was his first game doing it. He kept missing and then it clicked in.

Marty: You think he was nervous?

McGee: I asked him. He said, “No, I’m good. But then again, they haven’t set this spear on fire yet, so we’ll see.”

Marty (laughs): How about Michigan, when they run out at the 50-yard line, leaping in the air to slap that banner and run into the Big House? Or Notre Dame, when the team emerges after you know the players just smacked that “Play like a champion today” sign?

McGee: Or Autzen Stadium at Oregon, the loudest place I’ve ever been that wasn’t a racetrack. I was there with Oklahoma and when the Ducks ran out, Adrian Peterson looked at me and he said something about how damn loud it was. But I have no idea exactly what he said because, well, it was so damn loud.

Marty: Listen, I am not a huge European soccer fan, and I know they have their traditions when it comes to entrances and chants and all of that. There are great traditions in every sport. But it’s the pageantry and the uniqueness of this, something like a stadium entrance that is never the same from one place to the other. This is what separates college football from everything else. It’s unparalleled throughout sport.

McGee: That’s it. Be unique. I just appreciate a good effort. You and I both grew up going to small college games, and you see it even there. You’re a Division II school with 2,000 students, so you can’t run through the “T” or pull off “Enter Sandman.” But you can paint up a banner. Your band can line it up. You can even get an inflatable tunnel to run through. Just own it.

Marty: That’s it. Get yourself a bouncy house. Everybody loves ’em a bouncy house.